Stratospheric ozone
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Stratospheric ozone by Stanislaw Cieslik

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Published by s.n.] in [s.l .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesPollution by halocarbons.
Statementby Stanislaw Cieslik. Pollution by halocarbons / by Francois Ramade ; translated by Lois Bowerman.
ContributionsBowerman, Lois., Ramade, François, 1934-
The Physical Object
Pagination57 p. :
Number of Pages57
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19983183M

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The first part of the book discusses the fundamentals of stratospheric-ozone research, including kinetics, the continuity equation, the concept of lifetimes, and co-ordinate systems. The second part describes the processes that affect stratospheric ozone: chemical production and loss and transport by the circulation of the by: "The heart of the book addressesthe fundamentals of stratospheric chemistry, ozone production loss, chemical families and partitioning, and transport of ozone. These chapters rise well above the competition, with clear explanations and crisply designed figures based on s-era satellite observations and modeling results.5/5(1). "The heart of the book addressesthe fundamentals of stratospheric chemistry, ozone production loss, chemical families and partitioning, and transport of ozone. These chapters rise well above the competition, with clear explanations and crisply designed figures based on s-era satellite observations and modeling : $ The Ozone Layer is an accessible history of stratospheric ozone, from its discovery in the nineteenth century to current investigations of the Antarctic ozone hole. Drawing directly on the scientific literature, Christie uses the story of ozone as a case study for examining fundamental issues relating to the practice of modern science and the Cited by: 1.

CHAPTER STRATOSPHERIC OZONE The stratospheric ozone layer, centered at about 20 km above the surface of the Earth (Figure ), protects life on Earth by absorbing UV radiation from the Sun. In this chapter we examine the mechanisms controlling the abundance of ozone in the stratosphere and the effect of human Size: KB. The ban on ozone-depleting chemicals is largely working, and the ozone layer is expected to recover, albeit slowly. Before starting Chapter 8, see Table An ozone-depletion snapshot. Section I looks at the atmosphere, and reactions in the stratosphere including CFC destruction, and ozone . From the discovery of ozone in the eighteenth century, through the late twentieth-century international agreements to protect humanity from the destruction of ozone in the stratosphere, Guy P. Brasseur traces the evolution of our scientific knowledge on air quality issues and stratospheric . CHAPTER STRATOSPHERIC OZONE. The stratospheric ozone layer, centered at about 20 km above the surface of the Earth (Figure ), protects life on Earth by absorbing UV radiation from the this chapter we examine the mechanisms controlling the abundance of ozone in the stratosphere and the effect of human influence.

The stratospheric ozone layer is Earth’s “sunscreen” – protecting living things from too much ultraviolet radiation from the sun. The emission of ozone depleting substances has been damaging the ozone layer. But through domestic and international action, the ozone layer is .   Accordingly, the book is divided into five sections entitled: Stratospheric ozone Atmospheric processes influencing stratospheric ozone Does man influence stratospheric ozone Effects and research Public policyCited by: Unfortunately, this book can't be printed from the OpenBook. If you need to print pages from this book, we recommend downloading it as a PDF. Visit to get more information about this book, to buy it in print, or to download it as a free PDF. The Stratosphere and the Ozone Layer -- II. Ozone Chemistry -- III. The Ozone Hole -- Explaining the Ozone Hole -- The Role of Polar Stratospheric Clouds -- Summary of Conditions for the Ozone Hole -- IV. Arctic and Global Ozone Destruction -- V. Ozone Depletion and Policy -- VI.